7 Habits of Highly Emotionally Intelligent Kids

  Emotional intelligence (EQ) is made of self-awareness, empathy, social skills, self-regulation, and intrinsic motivation. Research shows that kids with high emotional intelligence tend to be more engaged in school, have better relationships, and earn higher grades. Emotional intelligence is a skill that can be taught to children, starting when they’re as young as toddlers. Parents can help their kids cultivate these EQ skills by encouraging the following habits:       USE THEIR VOCABULARY TO IDENTIFY THEIR EMOTIONS High EQ children are good at labeling their emotions beyond just “good” and “bad.”  Use descriptive sentences, e.g., ‘I feel sad I cannot

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Supporting Children in a Time of Stress

In times of adversity and turmoil, stress evokes strong emotions and causes uncertainty. As parents, we are in the best position to help our children. The following tips have been prepared to provide broad guidelines to help parents in tough conversations. LISTENSome children want to talk about difficult situations and some won’t. Both reactions are normal. If they do want to talk, actively listen to their concerns, validate, and encourage the discussion. If they don’t feel like talking, don’t force it, but do check in. DON’T AVOID DIFFICULT CONVERSATIONSParents don’t want to cause anxiety in their children. This often results

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14 Ways to Build Leadership Skills in Children

Leaders come from a wide variety of backgrounds and have large personalities; as a parent, you have opportunities to be a role model to your children and instill leadership traits in them.  Here are 14 ways to develop leadership skills: VOLUNTEER TOGETHER Spend time serving humanity together; teach them about the difference they can make when they volunteer TEACH COMMUNICATION & ETIQUETTE SKILLS Teach kids introductions, public speaking, debate, presentation and etiquette; a leader has the ability to build relationships, inspire others, and communicate effectively TEACH INTEGRITY AND RESPECT Lead by example: Let your kids see you praise people and

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10 Ways to Help Your Child Succeed in Elementary School

Support from parents is key to helping kids do well academically.  Here are 10 ways parents can put their kids on track to be successful students. Attend Back-to-School Night and Parent-Teacher Conferences Kids do better in school when parents are involved in their academic lives. Attending back-to-school night at the start of the school year is a great way to get to know your child’s teachers and their expectations. School administrators may discuss school-wide programs and policies, too. Attending parent-teacher conferences is another way to stay informed. These are usually held once or twice a year at progress reporting periods. The conferences are a

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10 Ways to Teach Your Children to Overcome Obstacles

Many children learn early that obstacles are either there for someone else to deal with, or not worth the trouble. Consequently, too many young people leave school and enter the workplace without a good grasp of what’s possible. Here are 10 ways to teach your children to overcome obstacles:       BE A ROLE MODEL Kids learn most of what they know about problem-solving by watching their parents; demonstrate the deep satisfaction that comes with negotiating a challenge EQUIP THEM WITH THE RIGHT TOOLS Impart in them motivation, self-confidence, sound judgment, and experience in solving small problems PLAY PROBLEM-SOLVING GAMES AS

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Four Ways Schools Can Support the Whole Child

Four Ways Schools Can Support the Whole Child Currently, our education system often focuses on a narrow sliver of children’s cognitive development with an emphasis on transmitting content knowledge, often to be memorized and repeated in the same form it was received. Lessons in math, science, and reading—and tests in those skills—dominate the curriculum.  While those subjects are fundamental, learning involves far more than merely acquiring inert knowledge in algebra or chemistry. Such a narrow focus gives short shrift to the ways that children need to grow and learn in their relationships, identity, emotional understanding, and overall well-being.  Recent research

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